THE SEVEN C’S OF SOUL WINNING

“Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.” – Mark 16:15

INTRODUCTION
I found this on the net and thought it very relevant for our time because the article talks about the number one business of the Church: the business of winning souls. It is what I call “The Seven Cs of Soul Winning.”

1. Commission
God wants us to take the Gospel to Others. We need to get out into the world! Jesus was not crucified between two candles on a church altar. He was crucified out in the byways and highways of humanity, and that is where we must take the message.

Jesus said, “Follow Me, and I will make you become fishers of men.” That is a promise. But you know what? You have to get to the water if you are going to catch fish. You have to get out of the four church walls, out to where hurting humanity is, and engage them with the gospel.

No one could catch a fish sitting in camp. A lot of Christians just hang around the camp. They form fishing clubs and talk about how important it is to fish. But they don’t fish. God wants us to go fish!

2. Compassion for the Lost
In Mark 16:16 Jesus said, “He who believes and is baptized will be saved; but he who does not believe will be condemned.”

This means eternally separated from God with no opportunity of rescue or retrieval. Forever lost. Think about it! Do you recall the story Jesus told of the rich man who died? It ought to send a shudder through the heart of even the most brazen sinner. Jesus tells us that the rich man died and was in torment, in flame.

Jesus goes on to say that the rich man lifted up his eyes, and begged for mercy. But no mercy came, even as it says in Revelation 14:11, “The smoke of their torment ascends forever and ever.” I know it is not a popular subject in the Church to talk about hell, but Jesus talked more about hell than He did about heaven. It is a very real place.

If we would consider just for a moment the end of the man or woman who rejects Christ, it ought to cause our hearts to be stirred with compassion. Our compassion for the lost ought to move us to do all we can to share Christ with them!

3. Common Ground
We need to endeavour to find common ground with people. In 1 Corinthians 9:19-24, Paul says, For though I am free from all men, I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win the more; and to the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might win Jews; to those who are under the law, as under the law, that I might win those who are under the law; to those who are without law, as without law (not being without law toward God, but under law toward Christ), that I might win those who are without law; to the weak I became as weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all men, that I might by all means save some.

Now this I do for the gospel’s sake, that I may be partaker of it with you. Do you not know that those who run in a race all run, but one receives the prize? Run in such a way that you may obtain it.

In this passage, Paul is talking about the way he ran—the method he used—to reach people for Christ. Verse 22 in The Living Bible puts it this way: “Yes, I try to find common ground with everyone so that I might bring them to Christ.” Paul didn’t run aimlessly. And like Paul, we have to find a point to relate to people so that you can build a bridge over which the gospel can come.
I encourage you today to find a common area of interest, a common ground, to relate to people in order to share Christ with them.

4. Character Counts
1 Corinthians 9:24-27, particularly verse 27, tells us the importance of character in witnessing to others, “Do you not know that those who run in a race all run, but one receives the prize? Run in such a way that you may obtain it. And everyone who competes for the prize is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a perishable crown, but we for an imperishable crown.

Therefore I run thus: not with uncertainty. Thus I fight: not as one who beats the air. But I discipline my body and bring it into subjection, lest, when I have preached to others, I myself should become disqualified.”
Paul said he was temperate in all things, that he disciplined his body. He would bring it into subjection, meaning he had problems keeping his body in subjection, just like you and I do.

Every one of us has a propensity toward certain sins. It is important, though, that we rein in our flesh and that we are temperate in all things because our lifestyle affects our message.
If your character is out of whack, people are going to have a hard time hearing what you have to say. Character counts!

5. The Comforter
Many times when Jesus spoke of the Holy Spirit, He referred to Him as the Comforter. In Acts 1:4-5, after the resurrection, Jesus said something to the disciples that was very intriguing, “And being assembled together with them, He commanded them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the Promise of the Father, “which,” He said, “you have heard from Me; for John truly baptized with water, but you shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.”

He had already told them to go into all the world, but then He said, “Hey, you need to wait for something. There’s some equipment you need before you go. Don’t go start a Bible study, don’t go pass out a tract, don’t do anything. You need something first. You need to be baptized with the Spirit.” Then look at what He said in verse 8, “But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be witnesses to Me in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.”

The Holy Spirit gives us power to be a witness. There is something beyond even living a life of integrity. There is a supernatural, captivating element when a person is filled with the Holy Spirit that makes the witness of the gospel even more inescapable. Jesus was so strong on it He said, “Look, don’t leave Jerusalem without it.” God has given us His Holy Spirit, the Comforter, to empower us to reach our generation for Christ.

6. Convicting and Convincing
John 16:7-9 helps us understand Jesus’ role clearly. Here Jesus is talking to the disciples about the coming of the Holy Spirit, the Comforter, “Nevertheless I tell you the truth. It is to your advantage that I go away; for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you; but if I depart, I will send Him to you. And when He has come He will convict the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment: of sin, because they do not believe in Me.”

Jesus is not telling us that we need to pray, “Holy Spirit, go convict this person.” Rather, the foundation from which He is speaking is found in John 14. In that passage He says, “When the Holy Spirit comes, He will no longer just be with you, but He will be in you.” In the following verses, He then talks about all the things the Holy Spirit does within us. And here, when He talks about the Holy Spirit convicting people of sin, He does that work when we engage them with the gospel.
When we talk to people about Christ, the Holy Spirit then goes to work.

7. Wise Counsel
It’s important we learn to share the Word with people. Our testimony is powerful and should be shared. But even though that may move people and influence people, they need to know they are anchoring their trust in the promises of God. Not just in a feeling they have gotten, not just because they feel influenced and moved—even if that is by the Holy Spirit.

Why? Because feelings change. Our feelings can go up and down like a rollercoaster. God’s Word makes it clear that He never leaves us nor forsakes us. When a person is saved, they need to be anchoring their faith on the promises of God, not on their feelings.

Promises like Romans 10:9-10, “That if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. For with the heart one believes unto righteousness, and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.”
So when we witness to people, we need to give them the counsel, the promises of the Word of God.

8. The Coming Reward
Daniel 12:3, which says, “Those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the firmament, and those who turn many to righteousness like the stars forever and ever.”

There is a coming reward for those who turn people to righteousness. The dearest thing to God’s heart is winning humanity and bringing them into His family. Nothing is more important to God. He bankrupted heaven and gave His only begotten Son to save humanity. The Bible teaches us that there will be a reward, my friend: authority in heaven, a place in heaven, honor in heaven.

In addition to that, I want to hear, “Well done, good and faithful servant.” Someday there is going to be a joy and a fullness in heaven, but there are some who will not experience that level of joy.
I think there is going to be something about being in heaven and seeing your fingerprints on people who are there because you shared, because you gave, and because you prayed. I believe there is going to be a greater joy for some because they did more for heaven while on earth than others.

Source: Answers with Bayless Conley.
Stay Blessed!

For further inquiries please contact us on Tel Nos. 0302-772013 or 0268130615
Email: saltnlightministries@gmail.com
Website: saltandlightgh.org

NURTURING THE YOUNG GENERATION, THE BIBLE WAY – PART 1

PREFACE
Every year The Bible Society of Ghana chooses a theme for the celebration of Bible week. During this week all churches focus on the theme and on the chosen scriptures to confirm that the Bible is indeed useful for “teaching… The week is also set aside to confirm the value of the Bible for everyday living. Last year’s theme was “The Bible and Our Civic Responsibility.”
This year’s theme is “Nurturing the Young Generation, The Bible Way”. It is our pleasure to bring you all the scriptures chosen to draw our attention to what the Bible says about how we can nurture the young generation using God’s Word and His principles for living Please let’s enjoy this article and allow it to impact our daily living.

INTRODUCTION
‘It’s great to be young’ is a well-known adage that carries both positive and negative connotations. Positively, it affirms the vibrancy, excitement and adventure which young people experience in their heydays. But it also points to the inexperience that quite often characterizes the youthful phase of life. Whichever way we look at, one thing remains clear: the young generation needs to be guided and nurtured into maturity so that as responsible citizens, they can build on the foundations laid by the older generation. This calls for careful mentoring in order to help them realize their full potentials. The onus, therefore, lies on the adult community to instil positive values in their young ones, serving as their role models in both attitude and conduct. But the young generation must also respond in humility and obedience, allowing themselves to be shaped as well as transformed into a great nation- builders. The Bible places a high premium on the Young Generation. It offers numerous guidelines regarding how they should be nurtured. It lays particular emphasis on the role parents ought to play in helping to shape tomorrow’s leaders. It also affirms that God can choose young people to carry out important responsibilities in the family, community, nation and the wider world.

1. Bringing the young generation into being through procreation has been an integral part of God’s purpose since the beginning of human existence.
Then God said, “Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so that they may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.” So God created mankind in His own image, in the image of God, He created them; male and female He created them.
God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful an increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. – Genesis 1:26-28a
The young are a priceless legacy to every community and they are precious in God’s sight.

Children are a heritage from the Lord, offspring a reward from Him. Like arrows in the hands of a warrior are children born in one’s youth. Blessed is the man whose quiver is full of them. They will not be put to shame when they contend with their opponents in court. – Psalm 127:3-5.

People were bringing little children for Jesus to place His hands on them, but the disciples rebuked them. When Jesus saw this, He was indignant. He said to them, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. Truly I tell you, anyone, who will not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will never enter it.” And He took the children in His arms, placed His hands on them and blessed them. – Mark 10:13-16.

2. Every child is born into a particular family or community. Genealogies, Families and Communities are thus important identity markers for the young generation.

“This, then, is the family line of Perez:
Perez was the father of Hezron,
Hezron the father of Ram,
Ram the father of Amminadab,
Amminadab the father of Nahshon,
Nahshon the father of Salmon,
Salmon the father of Boaz,
Boaz the father of Obed,
Obed the father of Jesse,
and Jesse the father of David.” – Ruth 4:18-22 (See also Matthew 1:1-17)

3. Community involvement in child outdooring is a vital socialization process or i=rite of passage for our young ones.
When it was time for Elizabeth to have her baby, she gave birth to a son. Her neighbours and relatives heard that the Lord had shown her great mercy, and they shared her joy.
On the eighth day, they came to circumcise the child, and they were going to name him after his father Zechariah, but his mother spoke up and said, “No! He is to be called John.”
Everyone who heard this wondered about it, asking, “What then is this child going to be?” For the Lord’s hands was with him. – Luke 1:57 -60 & 66.

4. Careful child weaning is an important nurturing ministry that should not be taken for granted.
Now the Lord was gracious to Sarah as he had said, and the Lord did for Sarah what he had promised. Sarah became pregnant and bore a son to Abraham in his old age, at the very time God had promised him. Abraham gave the name Isaac to the son Sarah bore him. When his son Isaac was eight days old, Abraham circumcised him, as God commanded him. Abraham was a hundred years old when his son Isaac was born to him.
Sarah said, “God has brought me laughter, and everyone who hears about this will laugh with me.” And she added, “Who would have said to Abraham that Sarah would nurse children? Yet I have borne him a son in his old age.”
The child grew and was weaned, and on the day Isaac was weaned Abraham held a great feast. – Genesis 21:1-8.

When her husband Elkanah went up with all his family to offer the annual sacrifice to the Lord and to fulfil his vow, Hannah did not go. She said to her husband, “After the boy is weaned, I will take him and present him before the Lord, and he will live there always.” “Do what seems best to you,” her husband Elkanah told her. “Stay here until you have weaned him; only may the Lord make good his[b] word.” So the woman stayed at home and nursed her son until she had weaned him. – 1 Samuel 1:21-23.

5. Parents/ Guardians and the older generation ought to provide a conducive environment for children to develop holistically.
When Joseph and Mary had done everything required by the Law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee to their own town of Nazareth. And the child grew and became strong; He was filled with wisdom, and the grace of God was on Him. Then He went down to Nazareth with them and was obedient to them. But His mother treasured all these things in her heart. 52 And Jesus grew in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man. – Luke 2:29-40& 51-52.

1 Corinthians 13:11 This includes nurturing them in the Christian faith

“I thank God, whom I serve, as my ancestors did, with a clear conscience, as night and day I constantly remember you in my prayers. Recalling your tears, I long to see you, so that I may be filled with joy.I am reminded of your sincere faith, which first lived in your grandmother Lois and in your mother Eunice and, I am persuaded, now lives in you also.” – 2 Timothy 1:3-5. ( See also Proverbs 22:6).

Our young ones need to be nurtured and encouraged to constantly reconnect in a godly manner with their roots, culture or place of upbringing.

“He went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath day, he went into the synagogue, as was his custom. “I am a Jew, born in Tarsus of Cilicia, but brought up in this city. I studied under Gamaliel and was thoroughly trained in the law of our ancestors. I was just as zealous for God as any of you today.” – Acts 22:3.

6. The family connections of Jesus, as visiting young prophet-teacher-evangelist, was well known in His Nazareth community.
Jesus left there and went to His hometown, accompanied by His disciples. When the Sabbath came, He began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard Him were amazed.
“Where did this man get these things?” they asked. “What’s this wisdom that has been given Him? What are these remarkable miracles He is performing? Isn’t this the carpenter? Isn’t this Mary’s son and the brother of James, Joseph, Judas and Simon? Aren’t his sisters here with us?” And they took offence at Him. – Mark 6:1-3

To be continued!

Stay Blessed!

For further inquiries please contact us on Tel Nos. 0302-772013 or 0268130615

Email:  saltnlightministries@gmail.com

Website:  saltandlightgh.org 

WHERE THERE IS NO LAW – LAWLESSNESS WILL ABOUND.

They that forsake the law praise the wicked: but such as keep the law contend with them. – Proverbs 28:4

This proverb contrasts those who break the law and those who obey the law. The Law to which Solomon refers is the Law of Moses… which is also God’s Word. The Law of Moses was given for the good of the people of Israel. The commandments we are told to obey are those found in God’s Word, such as the Ten Commandments and other passages of instruction. To obey what God teaches in the Bible is self-preserving. To disobey is self-destructive.

  • The best way to oppose the wicked philosophies and lifestyles of this generation is a righteous life. You can make a strong statement and powerful illustration for truth and wisdom by your actions. You need not even open your mouth to argue for godliness.
  • If you compromise God’s commandments in your life, you commend and endorse the wicked by agreeing with them against God. Instead of commending the wicked by folly yourself, exalt righteousness and condemn sinners by showing the virtues of godliness.
  • It is easy to criticize the profane opinions and conduct of a God-hating society. The folly of sinners is visible everywhere. But words are cheap, and words are also very hollow if you compromise truth in your own life. Can you identify this partiality as hypocrisy?
  • Many sinners justify their disregard for God, religion, or righteousness by the hypocrisy of others. While this excuse will be rejected by Jesus Christ in the great Day of Judgment, nonetheless it points out the damage and danger of believers living carnal lives.
  • If wicked persons see compromise or inconsistency in your life, they will be strengthened in their folly and rebellion. They will be comforted that you are not much different from them, so they will continue on in their evil course without any check of conscience.
  • True Christians are a very small minority, so Jesus called them the salt of the earth and light of the world. “You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot. “You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead, they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven. – Matthew 5:13-16. If you compromise, you lose your saltiness and are good for nothing. If your light does not shine brightly, you contribute to the world’s darkness.
  • Sin is sin. Breaking one command is to be guilty of all. “For whoever keeps the whole law and yet stumbles at just one point is guilty of breaking all of it”. – James 2:10. If you ridicule sodomy, but fantasize about adultery or defraud your spouse of frequent sex, you are as wicked as the sodomite, and you are a hypocrite. “For He who said, “You shall not commit adultery,” also said, “You shall not murder.” If you do not commit adultery but do commit murder, you have become a lawbreaker. Speak and act as those who are going to be judged by the law that gives freedom, because judgment without mercy will be shown to anyone who has not been merciful. Mercy triumphs over judgment”. – James 2:11-13. God will judge such hypocrisy.
  • Keeping the law contends with the wicked – it fights and opposes them. But forsaking the law praises the wicked. If you cheat and compromise God’s holy standard of righteousness, you praise sinners by your choice to break God’s law just like they do.
  • Rather than picketing an abortion clinic, love and train your children by God’s Word. A loving family with godly and obedient children in public will say more against abortion than any discussion with the mindless murderers entering the baby-killing facility.
  • Upset about the high divorce rate? Then keep a perfect marriage. Divorce is just one aspect of a dysfunctional marriage; there are many more. Where are you compromising in your marriage? Have you examined it by the light of Holy Scripture?
  • Angry about the rebellious youth today? Make sure you drive the speed limit to respect civil authority, outwork your colleagues to respect business authority, submit to your husband to respect marital authority, and obey your pastor to respect religious authority.
  • Sick of hearing about evolution? Live like you know the Creator! Live like you were made for His glory, and He has the right to dictate the terms of your life. Glorify Him in all you do, and speak of Him as your Maker. You can condemn evolution this easy way.
  • Carnal Christianity is the norm today. It is loving pleasure more than God and having a form of godliness without any authority. Condemn these compromises by loving God more than pleasure and exalting His authority in your life more than church services.
  • Christian reader, godly living in every part of your life beautifies the gospel. “You, however, must teach what is appropriate to sound doctrine. and not to steal from them, but to show that they can be fully trusted, so that in every way they will make the teaching about God our Savior attractive.” – Titus 2:1,10 and protects it from the accusations of the wicked. “Be careful to live properly among your unbelieving neighbours. Then even if they accuse you of doing wrong, they will see your honourable behaviour, and they will give honour to God when He judges the world.” – I Peter 2:12. Your goal is to be a blameless and harmless son of God in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation and to be a light in the world for the glory of God. In the same way, let your good deeds shine out for all to see so that everyone will praise your heavenly Father. – Matthew 5:16.

Source: From a devotional on Proverbs I receive from time to time.

Stay blessed!

Please continue to join us on Asempa 94.7 FM – Sundays 5.30 am.,
Sunny 88.7 FM – Tuesdays 5:30 am; and
Uniiq 95.7 Fm – Saturdays 7:30 pm;
For our Radio Bible Study as well as Sunny FM 88.7 FM every Sunday at 3:30 pm.
For Hymn and their Stories.

SUCCESS

He must increase, but I must decrease” – John 3:30.

INTRODUCTION

To what extent should Christ’s followers today pursue success? John’s declaration that “He must increase, but I must decrease” (John 3:30) seems to repudiate the idea of personal achievement, recognition, or material gain – common measures of success in our society. Indeed, John himself showed none of the outward trappings of a successful ministry

So should believers avoid success as the world defines it? Can people be successful in their careers as well as their spiritual lives, or are the two mutually exclusive? Some Christians say that success on the job creates credibility for them to talk about Christ with coworkers. Others, however, claim that they no interest in being successful. But is that a genuine conviction, or are they merely avoiding the rough-and-tumble of a competitive marketplace? Would God prefer that His people be failures on the job, in society, or in life?

Questions like these barely scratch the surface of the complex, emotional issue of success. The people of Jesus’ day were no less interested in prospering than we are, even if they defined success in slightly different terms. So it’s not surprising that Scripture speaks to human ambition and achievement. It seems to affirm at least three important principles, as illustrated by John the Baptist:

1) Success is always measured by a set of standards established by some person or group. Many people of John’s day felt that they were assured of the blessing they were descendants of Abraham. Their religious leaders aggressively promoted and reinforced that idea (Matthew 3:7-9; Luke 3:8; John 8:39). John challenged them to reconsider that way of thinking. What mattered, he said, was faith in Jesus. That was the ultimate criterion by which God would measure people’s lives. Thus, unbelief would result in the ultimate failure – eternal death.

2)Why and how we pursue success is just as important as whether or not we achieve it. John’s listeners were ordinary people caught up in the everyday scramble to get ahead. But in their pursuit of gain they tended to ignore the needs of others and to take unethical shortcuts. John challenged them to make internal changes (that is, to repent) and to demonstrate those changes in their day-to-day responsibilities through charity, honesty, and justice (Luke 3:8, 10-14).

John himself was able to carry out his ministry because he had the right perspective on the assignment that God had given him. He recognized that he was merely a forerunner.

God would measure people’s lives. Thus, unbelief would result in the ultimate failure – eternal death.

3)Why and how we pursue success is just as important as whether or not we achieve it. John’s listeners were ordinary people caught up in the everyday scramble to get ahead. But in their pursuit of gain they tended to ignore the needs of others and to take unethical shortcuts. John challenged them to make internal changes (that is, to repent) and to demonstrate those changes in their day-to-day responsibilities through charity, honesty, and justice (Luke 3:8, 10-14).

John himself was able to carry out his ministry because he had the right perspective on the assignment that God had given him. He recognized that he was merely a forerunner to the Christ, not the Christ Himself (John 3:28-29). He knew that Jesus’ ministry was going to grow and expand, slowly eliminating the need for John – hence his statement that “He must increase, but I must decrease.”

God would measure people’s lives. Thus, unbelief would result in the ultimate failure – eternal death.

4)Why and how we pursue success is just as important as whether or not we achieve it. John’s listeners were ordinary people caught up in the everyday scramble to get ahead. But in their pursuit of gain they tended to ignore the needs of others and to take unethical shortcuts. John challenged them to make internal changes (that is, to repent) and to demonstrate those changes in their day-to-day responsibilities through charity, honesty, and justice (Luke 3:8, 10-14).

John himself was able to carry out his ministry because he had the right perspective on the assignment that God had given him. He recognized that he was merely a forerunner to the Christ, not the Christ Himself (John 3:28-29). He knew that Jesus’ ministry was going to grow and expand, slowly eliminating the need for John – hence his statement that “He must increase, but I must decrease.”

5) Obtaining success always carries a cost. John warned the people of God’s judgement using a simple, well-known image: “Even now the ax is laid to the root of the trees. Therefore, every tree which does not bear fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire” (Luke 3:9). Just as lumberjack would lay his ax at the foot of a tree while he decided which trees in a forest to cut, so God had sent John and Jesus as His final messengers before letting His judgement fall.

The people could choose what they wanted to do – whether to continue in their self-satisfied ways of unbelief, or turn toward God in repentance and obedience. Either way, there would be a cost involved. Unfortunately, most of them chose to reject John’s message and later Jesus’ message, with tragic results (see “Jerusalem Surrounded” at Luke 21:20).

For John, the cost of faithfully proclaiming his message was imprisonment and, eventually, execution (Matthew 14:1-12). Yet he gained a treasure all out of proportion to the price of martyrdom – the praise of Christ (11:7-11).

So should believers pursue success? Judging from the experience of John the Baptist and the people who followed him, the issue seems to be not so much whether we should pursue it, but how. In light of John’s message, it’s worth considering three crucial questions:

  • Who sets the standards by which I measure success?
  • What are my motives and behavior in pursuing success?
  • What price am I willing to pay to achieve success?

Solomon is a case study in how a person can be successful in terms of power, wealth, and prestige, yet lack the true success that comes from knowing and honouring God the way someone should. See “Solomon: Successful but Not Satisfied” at 2 Chronicles 1:1.

Jesus told a parable in which He showed that “True Success Means Faithfulness.” (Matthew 25:14-30)

Culled from The Word in Life Study Bible.

A Hymn A Day:

I Want A Principle Within – MHB 626

  1. I want a principle within
    Of jealous, godly fear,
    A sensibility of sin,
    A pain to feel it near.
  2. I want the first approach to feel
    Of pride or fond desire,
    To catch the wandering of my will,
    And quench the kindling fire.
  3. That I from Thee no more may part,
    No more thy goodness grieve,
    The filial awe, the fleshly heart
    The tender conscience give.
  4. Quick as the apple of an eye,
    O God, my conscience make;
    Awake my soul when sin is nigh,
    And keep it still awake.
  5. O may the least omission pain
    My well instructed soul,
    And drive me to that blood again,
    Which makes the wounded whole.

Charles Wesley, 1707-88 

Stay blessed!
Please continue to join us on Asempa 94.7 FM – Sundays 5.30 am.,
Sunny 88.7 FM – Tuesdays 5:30 am; and
Uniiq 95.7 Fm – Saturdays 7:30 pm; for our Radio Bible Study as well as Sunny FM 88.7 FM every Sunday at 3:30 pm. for Hymn and their Stories.